Thursday, August 13, 2009

Wild times back in the 15th century

Silence may follow
stiletto's merge with traitor
heart grasps freshest wound

Physical love warped
crude disposal of souls
numb and dead to touch

So did those haikus spark your interest? They are inspired by the book I just finished, The Borgia Bride by Jeanne Kalogridis. This book kept me up for the past week. Kalogridis knows how to keep your interest as she weaves a tale based on some juicy historical facts about the papal court of Pope Alexander VI. Talk about a world full of treachery, ambition, immorality and inhumanity! The story is told candidly and vividly through the eyes of Sancha, Princess of Aragon and wife to the Pope's illegitimate son, Jofre. Sancha is a historical fiction character that will be hard to forget. Considering the amount of debauchery described in this novel, I was surprised to learn that most of it was not sensationalized by the author's imagination. I wouldn't want to be anywhere near that papal court. There was no safe place to hide from those hungry for more power and perversity.

Well written and thoroughly researched, I would recommend this book to any historical fiction buff. Images from this book are still in my head. There is some good movie material here.

Off to my next reading adventure!

20 comments:

Jillien said...

"Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely"

as they say.

JM

glnroz said...

Ms. Septembermom,
thanks you very much for the respone today.

Judith Ellis said...

Thanks, Kelly, for the recommendation. I really liked the haiku. By the way, I am currently writing a novel loosely based on my family. I hope you will read it when it comes out. My "mom" has a large role. I think some of her wisdom and imperfections come through. There is a whole lot of fiction too.

LuAnn said...

Thanks for the tip!!!

Christy said...

I love love historical fiction. Thanks for the recommendation. I need something to read.

kisatrtle said...

I love book recommendations. Thanks!

Tabitha@ichoosebliss said...

Thank you for following my blog. I hope you find tons of inspiration within it!

Dan said...

Historical fiction can be a good read. The moral and societal pendulum has been to both extremes several times in the last few thousand years - one of the constants of life.

Michelle said...

Ooo, that sounds good. I love historical fiction (curently re-reading the 1,000 page Fiery Cross by Diana Gabaldon and 80 pages left, so I need something new!). Thanks for the tip.

Nina P. said...

Great Haikus! and thanks for the book review and reccomendation! Love and Light, Nina P.

Ann Victor said...

This book sounds exactly what my Mom enjoys reading so shall add it to my shopping list to give her a treat.

Loved the haikus and also the "Poetry Quickfire" post. Your poetry is very good; evokes excellent images. :)

Ann Victor said...

PS Also loved the photo of you with your happy gang at the bowling alley!! Looks like you were having great fun!! :):)

Mon said...

I'm not really a historical fiction buff, but this one sounds intriguing. Will keep a note of it. Thanks!

Ms Perfect said...

...it made me cry. Really hit home. I'm a wreck. You're talented when your work speaks to people.

~She Poet~ said...

I love to read books that you just can't put down, then feel sad when it's over only to start at the beginning again to recapture the moment. Great Haikus, I see you're experimenting with form. Keep it up!

Lois Lane II said...

Oooh -- I want to read it. Thanks for the info!!

Don said...

This sounds as bad or worse than today. Do today's social critics and doomsday writers read historical fiction? (They might discover that history is full of human cultures in crisis. Ours is not so unique, nor the worst.) Just my guess.

Dan Felstead said...

Septembermom...sounds like a great book...I am going to check it out.

Dan

H F W said...

I'm interested; thanks for sparking my curiosity! I read my first historical fiction in a long time this summer, and I've been wanting to read another good one before the bean comes.

Kim said...

This does sound really good. I loved Ken Follet's books based in the same era - I love when the fiction is close to fact - it lets you picture life back then and be thankful that you didn't live during such a savage time!